Gini Nelson\’s Engaging Conflicts

September 28, 2006

Kenneth Cloke: Paths to Transcendence, Part One

 

Kenneth Cloke’s new book, The Crossroads of Conflict: A Journey Into the Heart Of Dispute Resolution, is a book by an experienced mediator about many things, including his conclusions after many years of a rich and varied practice. Ken will be interviewed this fall and early winter in Engaging Conflicts Today, and has given permission to excerpt portions of his book here. In his book, he proposes and explores the transcendent mediation style (see this earlier post on styles of mediation, and this earlier post on his definition of transcendence). Here are the first five of his ten paths to transcendence – the final five will be posted next week:

[Five of the] Ten Paths to Transcendence:

 

1. Engage in committed, openhearted listening, as though your life depends on what you are about to hear.

2. Use a spotlight of narrow, focused attention and a floodlight of broad, sweeping awareness to clarify what is taking place beneath the surface.

3. Use dangerous empathy to search for the center of the conflict within yourself, then ask questions to discover whether the same might be true for others.

4. Use dangerous honesty to communicate your deepest understanding to others.

5. Use your heart to locate a heart space in the conversations, then open and expand it.

Ken’s book can be purchased directly from his publisher, Janis Publications.

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11 Comments »

  1. […] Last week I posted the first five of “ten paths to transcendence” identified in Kenneth Cloke’s new book, The Crossroads of Conflict: A Journey Into the Heart Of Dispute Resolution (see last week’s post for the first five and for Ken’s definition of transcendence). Here are the final five: […]

    Pingback by Kenneth Cloke: Paths To Transcendence, Part Two « Gini Nelson’s Engaging Conflicts — October 2, 2006 @ 5:21 am | Reply

  2. […] Last week I posted the first five of “ten paths to transcendence” identified in Kenneth Cloke’s new book, The Crossroads of Conflict: A Journey Into the Heart Of Dispute Resolution (see last week’s post for the first five and for Ken’s definition of transcendence). Here are the final five: […]

    Pingback by Gini Nelson’s Engaging Conflicts » Kenneth Cloke:Paths to Transcendence, Part Two — EngagingConflicts.com — December 17, 2006 @ 2:46 pm | Reply

  3. […] Scientific American magazine in a recent Science News column identified six “raging debates” in current scientific theory. The articles remind us that scientific theory is created, developed, and supported (or not) in a process involving people and time, and that its final, accepted form will seldom be the same as its earliest iterations. Here’s the introduction: Textbooks usually make the triumph of a scientific theory seem inevitable and uncontestable. But at the time that a theory is being forged, the reality is not nearly so tidy. An experimental result is only clear-cut if researchers agree on how to interpret it. Individuals may have conflicting hunches about what nature is up to, however, and a finding that is conclusive to one scientist may be unimpressive to another. In some cases the ideal experiment is not yet possible. In others only one or a few data points exist. Disagreement is productive, though. It forces each side to clarify its views and to find experiments that will distinguish one idea from another. And in the end, researchers generally come to a new consensus. Experiments corroborate each other. Theories make defensible predictions. And new students come along who lack the prejudices of their predecessors. Science marches ahead, in other words, erasing m any records of dissent along the way. Here are six raging debates that textbooks will one day no doubt present as cut-and-dried: Is String Theory Unraveling? Is Global Warming Raising a Tempest? […]

    Pingback by Gini Nelson’s Engaging Conflicts » Is String Theory Unraveling? Does Sprouting New Brain Cells Cure Depression? — EngagingConflicts.com — December 17, 2006 @ 3:02 pm | Reply

  4. […] Here’s an online Scientific American article on sex differences in the brain. […]

    Pingback by Gini Nelson’s Engaging Conflicts » Sex Differences In the Brain — EngagingConflicts.com — December 17, 2006 @ 3:03 pm | Reply

  5. […] Many of us are fascinated by male – female differences, or, rather, by investigations into what the differences are, if any, and, further, what the differences mean, if anything. Here, too, science literacy reigns. Or, rather, should.A new book that has generated much buzz is also generating criticism about one of the points used to promote its premise. This from ScienceBlogs, specifically from The Frontal Cortex blog: […]

    Pingback by Gini Nelson’s Engaging Conflicts » Science Literacy and the Female Brain — EngagingConflicts.com — December 17, 2006 @ 3:06 pm | Reply

  6. […] Kenneth Cloke’s new book, The Crossroads of Conflict: A Journey Into the Heart Of Dispute Resolution, is a book by an experienced mediator about many things, including his conclusions after many years of a rich and varied practice. Ken will be interviewed this fall and early winter in Engaging Conflicts Today, and has given permission to excerpt portions of his book here. Here’s a partial list of philosophical assumptions he makes about conflict — the earlier propositions were posted earlier in the week: […]

    Pingback by Gini Nelson’s Engaging Conflicts » Five Philosophical Propositions on Conflict Resolution, Part Two — EngagingConflicts.com — December 17, 2006 @ 3:07 pm | Reply

  7. […] You have probably seen television ads or received direct mail advertisements for some of the commercial VoIP offerings, but there is also a free service, Skype. Because it’s free, you can try it out very cheaply, to see if it is a technology you want for your home or office.VoIP, known as “voice over internet protocol,” allows you to place and receive phone calls (and text and instant messages, and conference calls) over your computer’s internet connection line. I just signed up with Skype last week, and it was easy. First, you need at least a dsl speed internet connection (dial up doesn’t work well); second, you download the free software from the http://www.skype.com website that allows you to access the program; third, you add the equipment you will use to listen and talk during a phone call – I am using a usb-connection headset with a skype-quality microphone (cost me $40), but I could easily have bought a usb-connected handset phone (also for $40); and, finally, you enter the phone number you are calling, either into the progam in your computer (if you are using a headset) or into the handset of the handset phone, if you are using that. The sound quality can vary, but it seems to be at least as good as that of a cell phone, and is truly excellent in some circumstances.Skype’s service is free for calls between Skype subscribers, where ever they are — I could talk with another Skype subscriber in another country for as long as I wanted, at no charge to either of us. Normally, calls to ordinary landline or mobile telephones are not free, but you can buy that service from Skype for the cost of a good, cheap long distance calling card. But – and here’s the really fun part – Skype has a promotion going that really makes this the time to try VoIP out. Through December 2006, Skype is providing free calls to ordinary landline and mobile phones (within the US and Canada). […]

    Pingback by Gini Nelson’s Engaging Conflicts » VoIP, Skype and Cyberweek 2006 Teleconferences — EngagingConflicts.com — December 17, 2006 @ 3:11 pm | Reply

  8. […] Kenneth Cloke’s new book, The Crossroads of Conflict: A Journey Into the Heart Of Dispute Resolution, is a book by an experienced mediator about many things, including his conclusions after many years of a rich and varied practice. Ken will be interviewed this fall and early winter in Engaging Conflicts Today, and has given permission to excerpt portions of his book here. Here’s a partial list of philosophical assumptions he makes about conflict — the remaining propositions will be posted later in the week: […]

    Pingback by Gini Nelson’s Engaging Conflicts » Five Philosophical Propositions on Conflict Resolution, Part One — EngagingConflicts.com — December 17, 2006 @ 3:12 pm | Reply


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