Gini Nelson\’s Engaging Conflicts

October 2, 2006

Kenneth Cloke: Paths To Transcendence, Part Two

Last week I posted the first five of “ten paths to transcendence” identified in Kenneth Cloke’s new book, The Crossroads of Conflict: A Journey Into the Heart Of Dispute Resolution (see last week’s post for the first five and for Ken’s definition of transcendence). Here are the final five:

[Five of the] Ten Paths to Transcendence:

6. Craft a question that asks people to speak and listen directly from their heart

7. Work collaboratively to redesign and reform the cultures and systems that produced or reinforced the conflict.

8. Clarify and reinforce what was learned from the conflict, and use it to improve and evolve to higher levels of conflict and resolution.

9. Move the conversation toward forgiveness and reconciliation.

10. Design and execute a ritual of release, completion, and closure.

Ken’s book can be purchased directly from his publisher, Janis Publications.

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September 28, 2006

Kenneth Cloke: Paths to Transcendence, Part One

 

Kenneth Cloke’s new book, The Crossroads of Conflict: A Journey Into the Heart Of Dispute Resolution, is a book by an experienced mediator about many things, including his conclusions after many years of a rich and varied practice. Ken will be interviewed this fall and early winter in Engaging Conflicts Today, and has given permission to excerpt portions of his book here. In his book, he proposes and explores the transcendent mediation style (see this earlier post on styles of mediation, and this earlier post on his definition of transcendence). Here are the first five of his ten paths to transcendence – the final five will be posted next week:

[Five of the] Ten Paths to Transcendence:

 

1. Engage in committed, openhearted listening, as though your life depends on what you are about to hear.

2. Use a spotlight of narrow, focused attention and a floodlight of broad, sweeping awareness to clarify what is taking place beneath the surface.

3. Use dangerous empathy to search for the center of the conflict within yourself, then ask questions to discover whether the same might be true for others.

4. Use dangerous honesty to communicate your deepest understanding to others.

5. Use your heart to locate a heart space in the conversations, then open and expand it.

Ken’s book can be purchased directly from his publisher, Janis Publications.

September 12, 2006

The Crossroads of Conflict, by Kenneth Cloke

Kenneth Cloke’s new book, The Crossroads of Conflict: A Journey Into the Heart Of Dispute Resolution, speaks from a transforming perspective to conflict resolution;in his book, he urges a goal of transcendence. Ken will be interviewed this fall and early winter in Engaging Conflicts Today, and has given permission to excerpt portions of his book here. I’ll start with some easy pieces — some of the basic definitions he uses:

Resolution … means working through the content, or underlying reasons for conflict, and abandoning the old ways of thinking and behaving that led to them. Transformation means altering the contour, form, or shape of the conflict, both within the parties and in their relationships, communications, and perceptions of the issues over which they are fighting. Transcendence means moving beyond form and content to change the context, system, environment, and meaning of the conflict. This implies that the parties have learned how to evolve, outgrown, or rise above what was keeping them stuck, and are now ready to handle a higher level of conflict and order of resolution.

Ken’s book can be purchased directly from his publisher, Janis Publications: http://www.janispublications.com.

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