Gini Nelson\’s Engaging Conflicts

March 26, 2007

Free Workshop On Applications of Psychological Type in Conflict Communication Offered at New Mexico Mediation Association’s Winter Convocation — EngagingConflicts.com

Filed under: Business,Theory To Practice,Tips, Treats, and Tools — Gini @ 10:50 am

easel.jpgThe New Mexico Mediation Association’s March 31st Winter Convocation at the UNM Law School offers two tracks of workshops with four free workshops within each track. I’m presenting Communicating with Psychological Type in Mind During Conflict. It’s based on Carl Jung’s principles of psychological type as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®), probably the most widely used assessment instrument of its kind (millions are administered annually in the US, and more in other countries around the world). I’ll overview applications in mediation and benefits to mediators and other conflict specialists in knowing and applying the principles, including assisting clients getting through misunderstandings based on type differences, identifying blind spots in the problem- solving process based on type, use of type to bridge cultural and gender differences based on type similarities, and the mediator’s own use of type to identify the kind of practice she wants. I’m a qualified administrator of the MBTI®, and greatly appreciate it as a tool.

Use of this psychological type analysis is better studied in the law practice field than in the mediation practice context. The most notable law-related works are University of Florida Law Professor Don Peters’ article, Forever Jung: Psychological Type Theory, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and Learning Negotiation, 42 DRAKE LAW REVIEW 1 (1993); and Florida Coastal School of Law Professor Susan Swaim Daicoff’s book, Lawyer, Know Theyself: A Psychological Analysis of Personality Strengths and Weaknesses, American Psychological Association (2004). Direct works are slowly showing up in the mediation practice context, most notably in Sondra S. VanSant’s Wired For Conflict: The Role of Personality in Resolving Differences, Center for Application of Psychological Type, Inc. (2003).

The other workshops offered Saturday are:

 

Journey into the Heart of Conflict: A Creative Exercise for Your Inner Author (Using Both Sides of Your Brain) presented by Cynthia Olson, with Wallace Ford

 

Mediation is the journey into the complexity of conflict, searching collaboratively for the links which can tie the elements of resolution and transformation. The mediator’s own journey and experience contributes to this adventure – we are where we’ve been. Come write a book about your personal journey, take the next step on your quest!

 

 

Cultural Competency for Mediators, presented by Tonya Covington

 

As the country becomes more diverse and the majority population prepares to become the minority, cultural competency is imperative. This is particularly true in New Mexico, where mediators are increasingly called upon to mediate inter-cultural disputes. Learn tips on mediating for other cultures and across cultures.

 

 

Engaging Reluctant Parties, presented by Stéphane Trustorff Luchini

 

Prospective participants in a conflict intervention process may initially indicate reluctance or resistance to participate when approached by a mediator or other intervenor. Such parties may be engaged to participate, and when they do, will likely report satisfaction with the process as do parties who initially readily agree to participate. For mediation and restorative justice that uses mediation to be widely accepted, mediators may have to be able to effectively engage initially reluctant or resistant prospective participants. Stéphane Trustorff Luchini will present research findings and practice applications, and facilitate an illicitive inquiry of this topic with workshop participants.

 

 

Building Your Mediation Business, presented by Debra Oliver

 

Are you one of those mediators and/or facilitators who would like to transform your volunteer practice into a paying proposition or quit your day job? If so, you won’t want to miss Debra Oliver as she talks about the importance of marketing yourself, thinking and acting like an entrepreneur. Debra will also talk about the importance of finding good mentors and the value of mentoring others.

 

 

Ethics and Power in Mediation, presented byWallace Ford

 

New Mexico Mediation Association has a statement of ethics to which all members agree, as does the Association for Conflict Resolution. This statement points the mediator toward the moral and spiritual foundations upon which our conflict resolution is built. This workshop will explore key moral and spiritual themes embedded in the mediation experience, distinguishing the frames-of-reference we use and identifying the metaphors of well-being which guide our work. Particular attention will also be paid on how reason-giving establishes the power dynamic of conflict and ways the mediator narrates balance.

 

 

 

Latino Families and Domestic Violence, presented by Mariana Montejano (Community outreach trainer, New Mexico Coalition Against Domestic Violence)

 

Domestic violence is a crucial issue for any mediator working with family and divorce mediation to be able to screen for and recognize. Cultural context shapes everyone’s life and domestic violence occurs in most if not all cultural contexts. This session will discuss domestic violence in the context of Latinas’ lives – daily experience, reality (“way of living”), and psyche (“way of thinking”) to better understand domestic violence within the Latino community. Come explore how to work specifically with this cultural group.

 

 

Thank you, New Mexico Mediation Association for sponsoring this event, and thank you, to all presenters for their volunteer efforts in enriching the practice of mediation!

January 9, 2007

Engaging Conflicts In 2007 — EngagingConflicts.com

Please note the new address: http://www.EngagingConflicts.com.

In 2007, Engaging Conflicts will continue to center on issues identified by Bernie Mayer’s Beyond Neutrality: Confronting the Crisis in Conflict Resolution, Chris Honeyman’s Theory to Practice work (focusing on his new book, The Negotiator’s Fieldbook: the Desk Reference for the Experienced Negotiator, co-edited with Andrea Kupfer Schneider), and the October 2006 Keystone Consolidating Our Collective Wisdom conference; as well as my Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! program – use of the new social media on the internet for professional, personal and business development. I’ll provide Tips, Treats, and Tools, and talk about Health, Conflict and Stress, on occasion, too.

Some Guest Bloggers In 2007

Planned guest bloggers for 2007 include Kristine Paranica, J.D., Administrative Director and Fellow of the Institute for the Study of Conflict Transformation (ISCT) on transformative mediation and practice; and John Lande, J.D., Director of the Master of Laws Program In Dispute Resolution at the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Law, on cooperative law, as distinguished from collaborative law.

In Engaging Conflicts Today, the newsletter (subscribe by clicking in the sidebar!), I’ve planned interviews with Bernie Mayer, John Paul Lederach, Robert Benjamin, Chris Honeyman, Janis Magnuson (of Janis Publications), Diane Levin (of the Online Guide To Mediation blog), Jack Cooley, John Stephens, Ann Gosline, and Howard Gadlin, among others. And, as I said, The Negotiator’s Fieldbook, Chris Honeyman’s and Andrea Kupfer Schneider’s new book, will also be highlighted in 2007 (in both the newsletter and in the blog), with reviews, summaries and interviews.

At the new site, you’ll see the administrative categories tabbed across the topbar (Welcome, Contact, Why Engaging Conflicts?, Guest Bloggers, RSS FAQ). The first box at the top of the right sidebar lets you search the blog using keywords. You can then bookmark the blog at Technorati (use the green icon); subscribe to the blog for free at FeedBurner (use the orange icon); and then subscribe to Engaging Conflicts Today by clicking on the blue hyperlinked “Free Engaging Conflicts Newsletter!” I have fewer categories. Also, each post now allows linking with 13 different social content and social bookmarking websites, e.g., del.icio.us, digg and smarking. (If you don’t know what any of these terms and options are, spend some time in the Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! category!) Finally, I’ve disabled commenting, to help save the site from robotic spamming – write me privately, and I’ll respond, though.

REMEMBER: Please move your bookmark, and — try something new! — subscribe to Engaging Conflicts! If you’d like to learn more about RSS or web feeds from a podcast or blog consumer’s point of view, visit our RSS FAQ.

November 9, 2006

Web Science Includes the Social Impacts of Web 2.0

A Thinking Ethics post from Nov. 6:

Web science

MIT and the University of Southampton, UK, are launching the new field of Web Science. The research will guide the future design and use of the world wide web. Tim Berners-Lee says the web is full of blogs that are inaccurate, defamatory and have uncheckable information. This new program is aimed at adding intelligence to the web, and will cover things like trust, responsibility, empathy, and privacy. It looks like Web 2.0 will be kinder and gentler. more

The link goes to a New York Times article:

Web science, the researchers say, has social and engineering dimensions. It extends well beyond traditional computer science, they say, to include the emerging research in social networks and the social sciences that is being used to study how people behave on the Web.

Further:

Web science represents “a pretty big next step in the evolution of information,” said Eric E. Schmidt, the chief executive of Google, who is a computer scientist. This kind of research, Schmidt added, is “likely to have a lot of influence on the next generation of researchers, scientists and, most importantly, the next generation of entrepreneurs who will build new companies from this.”

Web science is related to another emerging interdisciplinary field called services science. This is the study of how to use computing, collaborative networks and knowledge in disciplines ranging from economics to anthropology to lift productivity and develop new products in the services sector, which represents about three-fourths of the United States economy. Services science research is being supported by technology companies like I.B.M., Accenture and Hewlett-Packard, and by the National Science Foundation.

And:

Ben Shneiderman, a professor at the University of Maryland, said Web science was a promising idea. “Computer science is at a turning point, and it has to go beyond algorithms and understand the social dynamics of issues like trust, responsibility, empathy and privacy in this vast networked space,” Shneiderman said. “The technologists and companies that understand those issues will be far more likely to succeed in expanding their markets and enlarging their audiences.”

 

November 8, 2006

Podcamp West – San Francisco — Not Just For Bloggers, Podcasters, and Video Bloggers (Vloggers)

It’s for everyone who wants to understand the new media better. I just checked – 128 registrants so far for Podcamp West – San Francisco, November 18 – 19, 2006. Are you coming? It’s an UnConference:

The power of an UnConference is you get FREE access to ideas, thoughts, best practices, and the true “wisdom of crowds” simply by registering and attending. An UnConference brings people with many different skill sets together with the spirit of sharing and learning. We’re audio and video podcasters, enthusiasts, businesspeople, hobbyists, musicians, promoters, marketers, and people who generally want to understand more about the new media space. We would like everyone to participate in some form or another and learn.

Here’s who should attend:

Podcamp West is for people interested in new media. Bloggers, Podcasters, Video Bloggers (Vloggers) are the people, who the conference serves best. If you’re interested in doing something with new media, you’ll want to attend. Are you an individual or school or library wondering how to incorporate podcasting into projects and community events? Are you a corporation type wondering how you should get involved in new Media? Are you a venture group thinking about whether to invest in this new media space? Come to PodCamp West, learn, share and you will have the answers.

Sessions:

Sessions spread over two days will focus on planning for content, content creation, content publishing and subscription models, production quality, tools, recording techniques, video composition, editing skills, audio & video post production techniques. Also included are sessions on Monetization of New Media formats, Podcasting and Video Blogging and impact of new media on business, Directly communicating with customers in Web 2.0 world, New Media marketing and public relations. The sessions are held in the format of a conversation with the people in the room participating actively.

Venue:

Podcamp West is being held in San Francisco at the historic Swedish American Hall. The venue has access to a few large areas to assemble for sessions and areas earmarked for decompressing and for demo tables. The venue is very accessible by public transport – you can ride a train, take a bus, or just ride your bike. It’s VERY accessible to folks either coming from far away or locally. Parking around is generally paid parking or unless you get a lucky parking spot on the road.

It’s free to attend but you do have to register. I’ve linked to the registration site in this earlier post, or go here.
Hope to see you there!

October 11, 2006

Keystone Conferees Welcome! Skype and Teleconference Call-In Details.

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 5:22 am

UPDATE OF ONLINE TELECONFERENCE CALL-IN AND SKYPE NUMBERS:

Here’s more information about calling in to Thursday’s free online teleconference for mediators and lawyers on marketing using the internet. I’m a panelist for it and it’s both a continuation of Cyberweek 2006 (that included participation of Keystone Conference attendees Colin Rule, Rachel Wohl, Cynthia Savage, Barbara Wilson and myself), and a program sponsored by the Colorado bar association’s ADR section and the Colorado mediation association – one of their joint monthly brownbag get-togethers. Please pass the information on to anyone else who might be interested.

The call in number from a land line or cell phone in North America is 1-712-432-4000, and when there, enter the code (conference room) number : 565 0382. For more on the teleconference, please see earlier post here, and for more about Skype see this earlier post.  Online registration will give you more information about use of chat and .pdf “handouts” in advance of the teleconference.  Finally, please also see the next paragraph (which I’ve copied in from the online site, so font is different):

The call in number from telephones in the United Kingdom is 0870 119 2350 and the code (conference room) number is the same as above 565 0382. There are other EU access numbers listed through the online registration site [and shown below]: If you are using Skype the number to call out to the teleconfence connection is:

+99008275650382 [the + preceeding the number is required]

How to connect: The teleconferences will be live over the internet via Skype and via dial up connections from telephone land lines in the US, Canada, UK, France, Germany and some other EU countries. Power point slides and other visuals will be available for down load before and/or viewing on line during the conferences.

The Vapps, Inc. phone bridge that makes this possible will handle up to 500 participants calling in from Skype and land lines. The phone bridge is being provided at no charge. However, participants calling in by telephone will be subject to the long-distance charge that the participant’s long-distance carrier. In the case of many calling cards and long distance plans this is about 5 cents a minute. There is no charge for the Skype service and the software required may be downloaded from: http://skype.com/

To test from a telephone the call in numbers are as follows:

In the US and Canada, call 1-712-432-4000

Calling from Europe, call
In Austria: 0820 400 01562
In Belgium: 0703 59 984
In France: 0826 100 266
In Germany 01805 00 7620
In UK: 0870 119 2350

See you there!

October 10, 2006

Landline and Cell Phone Call In Number for Marketing Mediation Online Teleconference

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 5:09 am

Here’s the more information about calling in to Thursday’s free online teleconference for mediators and lawyers on marketing using the internet.  I’m a panelist for it and it’s both a continuation of Cyberweek 2006 and a program sponsored by the Colorado bar association’s ADR section and the Colorado mediation association – one of their joint monthly brownbag get-togethers. Please pass the information on to anyone else who might be interested.  The call in number from a land line or cell phone is 1-712-432-4000,
and then, enter the code (conference room) number : 565 0382.  (Get the Skype call in details via the on-site registration.)  For more on the teleconference, please see yesterday’s post here.
See you there!

October 9, 2006

Free Marketing Mediation Excellence Online Teleconferences As Cyberweek 2006 Continues

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 12:49 pm

Mediation Excellence Online Teleconferences

Thursday, October 12, 2006 Topic: Marketing for Mediators and Lawyers

Marketing Mediation Excellence will be the theme of a free online teleconference to be presented by a group of mediators and lawyers — Robert Ambrogi, Diane Levin, Gini Nelson, Geoff Sharp and Louise Wildee — at 11 am Pacific, 2 pm Eastern, 7 pm UK/Ireland, and 6 am (the next day in) New Zealand.

The panelists will be referring to a set of power point slides that may be loaded on your computer and viewed during the online teleconference. The panelists will also be using an online text chat to coordinate their presentation as only Gini Nelson and Louise Wildee will be in Denver in the Colorado bar association offices with John DeBruyn, the program organizer, and Peter DeBruyn, the program’s technology coordinator. The other panelists Robert Ambrogi and Diane Levin will be at their computers in the Boston, Massachusetts area and Geoff Sharp will be at his computer in Wellington, New Zealand.

All of the conference participants are invited to sign into the online text chat to follow the text messages between the panelists and to ask questions and make comments during the question and further discussion segment of the program.

This online teleconference is a continuation of a series of Mediation Excellence programs presented during Online Dispute Resolution Cyberweek last month (September, 2006) — about 90 mediators and lawyers participated in the series of online teleconferences from around the world over the internet and via telephone.

The panelists will open with a brief overview of marketing and the internet and then discuss the use of several online publishing tools: web sites, e-newsletters and web journals or web logs aka blogs to market your practice.

The one hour program will consist of a 40 minute presentation by the panel and that will be followed by 20 minutes for questions and further discussion of the topic. You may connect via long distance telephone or voice over the internet using Skype which requires a high speed internet connection. Further information about the program and making the connection is at: http://coadr.com.

Further information about the program and making the connection is at: http://coadr.com and if you have any questions after going there, send an email to John DeBruyn, program organizer. The teleconference is also being presented as part of the ongoing joint luncheon programs jointly sponsored the ADR section of the Colorado bar association and the Colorado Council of Mediators which is Colorado’s professional mediators organization. That explains why the program originates from the state bar association offices and is set for 18:00 GMT which the noon hour in Colorado and the other states (and province of Alberta) in the Rocky Mountain Time Zone. The teleconference will be repeated live, one hour later, at noon Pacific, 3 pm Eastern, 8 pm UK/Ireland, and 7 am (the next day in) New Zealand. That is being done to extend the noon hour eat-in luncheon program to California and the other far western states and the province of British Columbia. Of course, where ever you are located in the world, you may join in this session of the program at what ever time that is in your time zone.

The web logs maintained by the panelists are at:

Robert Ambrogi
http://www.legaline.com/lawsites.html

Diane Levin
http://mediationblog.blogspot.com/

Gini Nelson
https://engagingconflicts.wordpress.com/

Geoff Sharp
http://mediatorblahblah.blogspot.com/

Further information about the program and making the connection is at: http://coadr.com and if you have any questions after going there, send an email to John DeBruyn, program organizer, at jdebruyn@debruyn.com.

September 20, 2006

VoIP, Skype and Cyberweek 2006 Teleconferences

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 5:58 am

You have probably seen television ads or received direct mail advertisements for some of the commercial VoIP offerings, but there is also a free service, Skype. Because it’s free, you can try it out very cheaply, to see if it is a technology you want for your home or office.

VoIP, known as “voice over internet protocol,” allows you to place and receive phone calls (and text and instant messages, and conference calls) over your computer’s internet connection line. I just signed up with Skype last week, and it was easy. First, you need at least a dsl speed internet connection (dial up doesn’t work well); second, you download the free software from the www.skype.com website that allows you to access the program; third, you add the equipment you will use to listen and talk during a phone call – I am using a usb-connection headset with a skype-quality microphone (cost me $40), but I could easily have bought a usb-connected handset phone (also for $40); and, finally, you enter the phone number you are calling, either into the progam in your computer (if you are using a headset) or into the handset of the handset phone, if you are using that. The sound quality can vary, but it seems to be at least as good as that of a cell phone, and is truly excellent in some circumstances.

Skype’s service is free for calls between Skype subscribers, where ever they are — I could talk with another Skype subscriber in another country for as long as I wanted, at no charge to either of us. Normally, calls to ordinary landline or mobile telephones are not free, but you can buy that service from Skype for the cost of a good, cheap long distance calling card. But – and here’s the really fun part – Skype has a promotion going that really makes this the time to try VoIP out. Through December 2006, Skype is providing free calls to ordinary landline and mobile phones (within the US and Canada).

So, for example, you could call in to all three of the Cyberweek 2006 teleconferences on Skype and pay no long distance charges for the calls. Indeed, what a great way to try VoIP at the same time as learning other innovative uses of the internet for conflict resolution!

For way more information about VoIP than you probably want at this time, here’s one detailed resource: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voice_over_IP.

September 18, 2006

Lawyers Blog More Than Mediators (and Mediators Blog Hardly At All)

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 9:23 am

Lawyer bloggers are ahead of mediator bloggers. Law blogs emerged in 2002, and, from a handful, the number has grown to over 1,500, according to a recent article published on the American Bar Association web site. Mediator blogs, in comparison, languish as an active “sport.” Indeed, Diane Levin, a mediator, trainer and attorney in the Greater Boston area, reports that there are today perhaps only 59 – yes, 59 – active blogs either devoted to alternative dispute resolution or regularly featuring posts about ADR, including Engaging Conflicts. Her blog, Online Guide to Mediation, was one of the first (in January 2005, I think). A leader then, she has maintained her commitment to excellence in blogging, and has started a new project, a directory of ADR blogs, found here.

September 15, 2006

Jim Melamed of Mediate.com Interviewed In Engaging Conflicts Today

Today’s issue of Engaging Conflicts Today is in the mail. We perhaps best know Jim Melamed through his innovative and entrepreneurial work at and through Mediate.com, which supports conflict specialists working to establish and maintain their niches. During the interview, after identifying some of his conflict resolution heros, Jim expanded on some of the programs sponsored by Mediate.com:

[T]his is exactly the purpose of the ‘Views from the Eye of the Storm’ project, to put the most capable faces on the field of mediation and to help both professionals and the public to best understand so many worthy endeavors. Leading mediators are great people doing great work and the combination is often jaw dropping. We are excited to sponsor a conference bringing together 100 of these leaders at Keystone CO Oct. 8-11, 2006, and we will also be video recording this ‘Consolidating Our Wisdom Conference’ as well. All of this is an example of our seeking to consolidate our best learning and then to use technology, both video and the Internet, to help best tell ‘the mediation story.’ I believe that these efforts are compelling.

The interview with Jim continues in Vol 1, #3 of the newsletter. If you haven’t already, please sign up today — it’s free and easy!

September 11, 2006

The Best Blogs Are Ahead Of Traditional Media

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 10:32 am

If you are reading this online, you know what a blog is, because Engaging Conflicts Today is a blog. Blogs are perhaps best known for their immediacy — unlike with most static websites, the blog owner expects to make frequent, short entries in this kind of on-line journal, and very easily does, sometimes several in a day. A reader goes to a blog to see both what’s new there, on that blog, and also, or perhaps especially, to see what’s new on the topic being addressed. The best blogs offer insights, information and support for new and innovative developments before more traditional media usually can organize around and respond to them.

Cyberweek 2006: Free Teleseminars For Us All

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 10:09 am

Stop the presses! Before I go on about blogs and blogging, please note a series of free teleseminars associated with Cyberweek 2006, starting in less than two weeks. You can register here: http://www.odr.info/cyberweek2006.

Here’s their invitation:

We invite you to participate in Cyberweek 2006 during the week of September 25th. Cyberweek is being organized this year by the University of Massachusetts Center for Information Technology and Dispute Resolution (CITDR) and InternetBar.org.

Tue, 26th The Intersection of Mediation, Facilitation, Coaching and Teaching — this conference and online discussion forum will focus on the shared skills, strategies and best practices of mediators, facilitators, coaches and teachers — new perspectives on building skills and improving strategies in one on one, one on two, small group and large group interactions.

Wed, 27th Mediation Excellence Program — This conference will focus on bringing the mediation community together to take mediation to the next level — a coordinated approach to quality assurance through education, training, mentoring, networking, evaluation, certification and standards — the role of cooperation and marketing in building a stronger mediation community.

Thu, 28th Mediation Excellence in Cyberspace — This conference will focus on how to learn and work together on an ongoing basis. The two perspectives covered by this teleconference and the online discussion forum will be: (1) supporting Mediation Excellence in online dispute resolution; and (2) using the internet for education, mentoring, networking and cooperation between mediators and mediation organizations in the quest for Mediation Excellence generally.

September 4, 2006

Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! The Series

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 9:17 am

What is Web 2.0 and why does it matter? A PEW Research Center study found that internet penetration has now reached 73% for all American adults. What are they doing on the internet, in their personal and in their business lives? What more could they be doing? What other uses are developing? What else might we be able to do within the next year or two?

You are reading this, so you already know something about blogs. How about wikis? RSS? VoIP? Podcasts? These are all part of Web 2.0, which, some say, is about making internet computing social, to include collaboration, conversation, community and connection. It also includes content creation, cumulative learning, and, in some circumstances, collective intelligence. In contrast, one example of Web 1.0 is a static website that seldom, if ever, changes content.
This series will run on Mondays. Next Monday: blogs and blogging.

August 31, 2006

Web 2.0 For The Rest Of Us — Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My!

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 12:22 pm

While internet penetration has now reached 73% for all American adults according to a PEW Research Center study, many attorneys and mediators do not know much about wikis and podcasts and blogs! What are they? What do they mean for American, and global, life? What do they mean for one’s practice, and business? What is “Web 2.0” and why does it matter? Check back Monday for the start of my new series — Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My!

August 12, 2006

20 Concepts and Recommendations for Utilizing the Internet: Another 5 Technical Recommendations (#4)

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 6:42 am

Jim Melamed’s innovative and entrepreneurial work at and through Mediate.com supports conflict specialists working to establish and maintain their niches, increasingly necessary for business success. His articles include 20 Concepts & Recommendations for Utilizing the Internet, Integrating The Internet Into Your Mediation Practice, and Mediating on the Internet: Today and Tomorrow (two parts).

Here’s the concluding part of 20 Concepts & Recommendations for Utilizing the Internet:

This article reviews 20 concepts and recommendations to assist you to most capably utilize the Internet in support of your Mediation practice.

10 Technical Recommendations

Recommendation #6. Get Detailed Statistics on your Web Site Performance and be able to understand your statistics.

Recommendation #7. Get Your Site Linked on other sites. This, along with meta tag key words, is the best way to rise in the search engines!

Recommendation #8. Be sure that your Meta Tags are Capable so that you are found by search engines, look good in the search engine reports and look good when people do get to your site.

Recommendation #9. Send out a Periodic Email Newsletter. This is the best way to remind referral sources that you exist and get them to your site.

Recommendation #10. Get Your URL Out There! You should have your web site on cards, stationary, directory listings, voice-mail, on articles and elsewhere.

For more information on the Internet in Mediation, see www.mediate.com/ODR

The next issue of the Engaging Conflicts Today newsletter features an interview with Jim that continues the discussion started with this posts. You can sign up for the newsletter by clicking on the “sign up” link in the upper right corner at the top of the blog site.

Biography: Jim Melamed, J.D., founded The Oregon Mediation Center, Inc. in Eugene, OR in 1983 and has been offering mediation services ever since. He is an adjunct Professor of Mediation at Pepperdine Law School, mediates organizational and legal matters in Oregon, Washington and California, and has assisted in the resolution of over 2,000 disputes. He also is the co-founder and CEO of Mediate.com (1996 to present), the most visited conflict resolution web site in the world; former Executive Director of the Academy of Family Mediators (1987-93, now merged into ACR); former Chair of the Oregon Dispute Resolution Commission; founding President and first Executive Director of the Oregon Mediation Association; and in 2003, he received the 2003 Oregon Mediation Association Award of Excellence.

August 11, 2006

20 Concepts and Recommendations for Utilizing the Internet: 5 Technical Recommendations (#3)

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 6:41 am

Jim Melamed’s innovative and entrepreneurial work at and through Mediate.com supports conflict specialists working to establish and maintain their niches, increasingly necessary for business success. His articles include 20 Concepts & Recommendations for Utilizing the Internet, Integrating The Internet Into Your Mediation Practice, and Mediating on the Internet: Today and Tomorrow (two parts).

Here’s the third part of 20 Concepts & Recommendations for Utilizing the Internet; the final part will post tomorrow:

This article reviews 20 concepts and recommendations to assist you to most capably utilize the Internet in support of your Mediation practice.

10 Technical Recommendations

Recommendation #1. Know your email software inside and out and utilize your email features to make your messages effective. A bit of bold or splash of color is wise to emphasize key information.

Recommendation #2. Use Nicknames and Your Address Book. This will help ensure that you get the address right and allows you to strategically group communications.

Recommendation #3. Use Your Mail Box System as an electronic filing system. Dump that file cabinet! With electronic filing, you can use your email search capacity to find important documents. Get in the habit of sending emails to yourself, often with attachments, with strategic subject lines that allow for easy filing and retrieval.

Recommendation #4. Use Email Stationary (Forms) to expedite individual and group mailing and to ensure quality and consistency of message.

Recommendation #5. Establish a Dynamic Web Site that you can easily change on an ongoing basis without additional cost.

For more information on the Internet in Mediation, see www.mediate.com/ODR

The next issue of the Engaging Conflicts Today newsletter features an interview with Jim that continues the discussion started with this post, and continues with tomorrow’s. You can sign up for the newsletter by clicking on the “sign up” link in the upper right corner at the top of the blog site.

Biography: Jim Melamed, J.D., founded The Oregon Mediation Center, Inc. in Eugene, OR in 1983 and has been offering mediation services ever since. He is an adjunct Professor of Mediation at Pepperdine Law School, mediates organizational and legal matters in Oregon, Washington and California, and has assisted in the resolution of over 2,000 disputes. He also is the co-founder and CEO of Mediate.com (1996 to present), the most visited conflict resolution web site in the world; former Executive Director of the Academy of Family Mediators (1987-93, now merged into ACR); former Chair of the Oregon Dispute Resolution Commission; founding President and first Executive Director of the Oregon Mediation Association; and in 2003, he received the 2003 Oregon Mediation Association Award of Excellence.

August 10, 2006

20 Concepts and Recommendations for Utilizing the Internet: Another 5 Concepts (#2)

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 6:41 am

Jim Melamed’s innovative and entrepreneurial work at and through Mediate.com supports conflict specialists working to establish and maintain their niches, increasingly necessary for business success. His articles include 20 Concepts & Recommendations for Utilizing the Internet, Integrating The Internet Into Your Mediation Practice, and Mediating on the Internet: Today and Tomorrow (two parts).

Here’s part two of 20 Concepts & Recommendations for Utilizing the Internet; the remaining two parts will follow throughout the week:

This article reviews 20 concepts and recommendations to assist you to most capably utilize the Internet in support of your Mediation practice.

First, 10 General Concepts to keep in mind.

Concept #6
Your Web Site Will Help You Close Deals. Web sites are increasingly how mediators are considered and compared. People will often be looking at your web site as they talk to you on the phone.

Concept #7
Dynamic Web Sites are Forgiving! You do not need to “get it perfect” before going public with a Dynamic Web Site. You can easily change your information on an ongoing basis. Fresh is good! Performance anxiety on the web is a thing of the past.

Concept #8
Clients Like the Internet. Using the Internet is convenient, affordable, empowering and has participants often at their edited “best.” In any event, there is a clear record of dialogue and this promotes responsiveness and accountability. It is an additional, valuable communication channel.

Concept #9
Providing Value on the Web is Rewarded. You will drive traffic to your web site with valuable content and this supports your occasional email newsletter to remind referral sources of your quality professional work.

Concept #10
You can Manage Your Internet Practice From Anywhere , including Hawaii.

For more information on the Internet in Mediation, see www.mediate.com/ODR

The next issue of the Engaging Conflicts Today newsletter features an interview with Jim that continues the discussion started with these posts. You can sign up for the newsletter by clicking on the “sign up” link in the upper right corner at the top of the blog site.

Biography: Jim Melamed, J.D., founded The Oregon Mediation Center, Inc. in Eugene, OR in 1983 and has been offering mediation services ever since. He is an adjunct Professor of Mediation at Pepperdine Law School, mediates organizational and legal matters in Oregon, Washington and California, and has assisted in the resolution of over 2,000 disputes. He also is the co-founder and CEO of Mediate.com (1996 to present), the most visited conflict resolution web site in the world; former Executive Director of the Academy of Family Mediators (1987-93, now merged into ACR); former Chair of the Oregon Dispute Resolution Commission; founding President and first Executive Director of the Oregon Mediation Association; and in 2003, he received the 2003 Oregon Mediation Association Award of Excellence.

August 9, 2006

20 Concepts and Recommendations for Utilizing the Internet: 5 Concepts (#1)

Filed under: Business,Wikis and Podcasts and Blogs, Oh My! — Gini @ 6:40 am

Jim Melamed’s innovative and entrepreneurial work at and through Mediate.com supports conflict specialists working to establish and maintain their niches, increasingly necessary for business success. His articles include 20 Concepts & Recommendations for Utilizing the Internet, Integrating The Internet Into Your Mediation Practice, and Mediating on the Internet: Today and Tomorrow (two parts).

I’ll reprint 20 Concepts & Recommendations for Utilizing the Internet here, to coincide with the start of a new, 10-part series of posts on blogging. Today is the first part; the remaining three will follow throughout the week:

This article reviews 20 concepts and recommendations to assist you to most capably utilize the Internet in support of your Mediation practice.

First, 10 General Concepts to keep in mind.

Concept #1:
You benefit from a Full Time Electronic Office. This is a gift to clients and referral sources and as necessary as a business card. A web site allows you to communicate effectively 365/7/24 and even when you are on vacation.

Concept #2
Use Memorable Web and Email Addresses. You want a memorable URL, one that is as short as possible and can easily be remembered and spelled. Matching email and web addresses are the way to go (for example jsmith@mediate.com and http://www.mediate.com/jsmith).

Concept #3
The Internet is Affordable. The cost of a quality web site as a landing spot for all marketing is very reasonable. You can market to email addresses for life for free. A quality web site also allows you to enhance all other advertising and to reduce the cost of other advertising.

Concept #4
The Internet is Convenient. Most people now prefer to receive their information digitally. This allows them to print or forward the information. There is no more need for the 3-panel color brochure. Visitors will print out your web pages if they have interest.

Concept #5
Include All of Your Information in a Boundless & Beautiful Web Site. By having all of your business information on the web, you lessen your own and staff labor and cost. Your clients and referral sources can also access all of your information instantly.

For more information on the Internet in Mediation, see www.mediate.com/ODR

The next issue of the Engaging Conflicts Today newsletter features an interview with Jim that continues the discussion started with this post, and continued with tomorrow’s. You can sign up for the newsletter by clicking on the “sign up” link in the upper right corner at the top of the blog site.

Biography: Jim Melamed, J.D., founded The Oregon Mediation Center, Inc. in Eugene, OR in 1983 and has been offering mediation services ever since. He is an adjunct Professor of Mediation at Pepperdine Law School, mediates organizational and legal matters in Oregon, Washington and California, and has assisted in the resolution of over 2,000 disputes. He also is the co-founder and CEO of Mediate.com (1996 to present), the most visited conflict resolution web site in the world; former Executive Director of the Academy of Family Mediators (1987-93, now merged into ACR); former Chair of the Oregon Dispute Resolution Commission; founding President and first Executive Director of the Oregon Mediation Association; and in 2003, he received the 2003 Oregon Mediation Association Award of Excellence.

March 31, 2006

Those “Other” Conflict Specialists — Attorneys, Attorney-Mediators and Non-Attorney Mediators — No Conflict Here!

Filed under: Attorneys and Mediators - No Conflict Here!,Business — Gini @ 1:38 pm

I'm passionate about Bernard S. Mayer's critique of the dispute resolution field given in his 2004 book, Beyond Neutrality: Confronting the Crisis in Conflict Resolution. If you have read it, you've guessed by now that it inspired this blog. I'm rereading it and will bring it into the blog from time to time, as I find Bernie's points so … engaging.

Among many critically important points, two are especially relevant here. He declared that the emperor has no clothes, i.e., that the field of conflict resolution is in crisis. That has as a consequence what I think is true (I may be mistaken) — that most non-attorney mediators are not wildly successful business people, in the sense of making a lot of money. Hence the "Business" category within the blog (which I promise will be helpful to attorneys, too. Face it, most attorneys learned nothing about having a successful business when they went to law school). I'm passionate about entrepreneurs (I am one) — I want us small business people to thrive.

Bernie, who is not an attorney, also raised to the level of public discussion the private grumblings some non-attorney mediators make about attorneys arriving on the dispute resolution scene. I'm an attorney, so I'll help raise to the level of public discussion the private grumblings some attorneys make about non-attorney mediators. Attorneys, attorney-mediators, non-attorney mediators — we are all here on the field to stay. In terms of business success and survival, it may get bloody. I hope this blog can help us all learn to "play together" better.

I'll share this blog category from time to time with others exploring how we can play together better. David B. River has been a full-time mediator, trainer and researcher since 1995, and is currently completing a Masters Degree in Dispute Resolution with the University of Massachusetts. He is not an attorney. His article, In Pursuit of Justice: Lawyers and Mediators Negotiating Identity, has just been published in Vol. 5 No. 1, Winter 2006 issue, Family Mediation Quarterly. Here's an excerpt (a link for the full article follows at the end):

 

As mediation becomes mainstream, there is a growing conflict between legal professionals, who traditionally resolve disputes, and mediators, who are bringing mediation to conflict areas that were previously handled by attorneys. The growing dispute is evidenced by an increasing number of lawsuits brought against mediators by state bar associations on grounds of “unauthorized practice of law.”

The popular reasons given for the conflict only partially explain its causes. Rubin and Levinger point out that “conflict over one set of issues is often confounded with, or obscured by, conflict over issues at a different level” (1995, pp.15-16) and in the case of mediators and attorneys, the most visible level of discussion is to define what is and isn’t the practice of law and who is entitled to discuss the law with people in conflict. Mediators claim that lawyers bring these lawsuits against mediators in order to protect their business interests and lawyers claim that mediators step into legal territory without legal training or ethics to guide them, leaving people with unjust or otherwise negative outcomes.

A much richer understanding of this struggle for definition is possible through the lens of identity and resource competition. The advent of mediation as a tool addressing conflicts that were previously handled by attorneys has blurred the distinctions of who is capable of addressing conflict, broadened the models for dispute resolution, and called into question the idea that adversarial approaches lead to the best outcomes for people in conflict. The success of mediation, drawing people who might otherwise have hired attorneys, is forcing attorneys to look at the assumptions about who they are, what their work accomplishes, and, in some cases, to transform.

On the other hand, mediators form a new profession with many different ideas, styles, practices and ethical codes. Under threat of lawsuits from the legal profession, mediators keep silent about how they discuss legal issues with clients, what forms best practices, and what distinguishes a cooperative approach to the law rather than a competitive one.

The tendency of identity conflict to escalate and define who is “in,” who is “out,” and therefore who is in an advantaged position with respect to resources hampers the development of both professions and keeps the focus away from the kinds of questions and research that would allow both professions to advance.

Here's the article: http://www.rivercadiz.com/Articles/In_Pursuit_of_Justice.htm.

March 29, 2006

First, Know Yourself, and Know That Conflict Is Part Of Business Success!

Filed under: Business — Gini @ 5:45 pm

What's so engaging about conflict and business success? Think of what I call the psychology of business success — managing conflicts with clients and managing difficult client situations are major components in success. Here's a quick example (without the statistics, which I don't have at my fingertips at the moment, but I can still make the point): even in a conflict as serious as a medical malpractice situation where somebody has been seriously, physically harmed, how the conflict was handled on the individual, personal level is one of the key factors that determines whether a medical malpractice lawsuit is filed. A patient who likes her doctor is much less likely to sue, than one who is indifferent to her doctor, or dislikes her doctor.

I believe that both effective conflict management and small business success are based on the following:

(1) knowing yourself and knowing how you are with other people — both your strengths and your weaknesses;

(2) knowing that other people often are normally and authentically different from you, and that they will hear you better and value your perspective more when you know to speak and present to them in the ways that matter to them (because of their differences from you), rather than primarily in the ways that matter to you. It's easiest to speak to and be heard by someone who is like you — but, really, we aren't all alike, and the differences matter!

3) having the skills and techniques the task at hand requires (e.g., active listening and reading nonverbal body language in conflict management, and doing or properly delegating such business skills as marketing and sales, financial management and human resources, in business success); and

(4) focusing on the relationship with the other person (in conflict and in business, and sometimes in both!), which in some ways brings it around back to #1, because your best relationships will develop when you know yourself and how you are with other people, well.

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